I'm just a girl on a mission - a mission to read many books, run (walk) many miles and ramble about it all!

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Read, Run, Ramble's bookshelf

Fangirl
Red Hill
Broken Wings
Running Like a Girl: Notes on Learning to Run
The F- It List
Angel Eyes
The Fault in Our Stars
After Her
Forgive Me, Leonard Peacock
The Boy Who Could See Demons: A Novel
Speak
Hopeless
Forever, Interrupted
The Never List
Doll Bones
The Rockin' Chair
When Mockingbirds Sing
Overcoming ADHD Without Medication: A Guidebook for Parents and Teachers
NOS4A2
The Silver Star


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Asker lieinthesky Asks:
Maggie, you are an inspirational writer, so I think your advice would be very valuable. What is your stance on swearing in books? As in, when is it effective, and when is it overdone or unnecessary? Any advice for writing with characters that might swear? Thanks in advance!
readrunramble readrunramble Said:

maggie-stiefvater:

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I must admit that as someone with more than a passing interest in how cultural constructs are treated as facts, I’m fascinated by swearing. Here is what swearing is: the arbitrary assignation of excessive power to one word over another. Some folks will say that swear words have more power or are more profane because of word meaning, but that’s not true. If it were, “screw” and “mate” and “rape” would be bleeped out like “fuck.” Other times, people maintain that a curse word’s offensiveness comes in because of intent. That when someone uses “fuck” they mean it to be worse than “intercourse.” I don’t think that’s true, either, because some of the nastiest words I’ve ever heard are “thank you,” said in a way meant to mean “I wish you were dead.” When you think about it, it’s a bizarre concept: that we make some words special by making them forbidden. That we somehow think that a single word without any context whatsoever can be offensive. Anyway, swear words don’t bother me. You’ll never curdle my milk using one on me.

Now, that said, as a writer, I’m very aware that they work on many other people. If I’m using them in a novel, it’s because I’m trying to tell you something. I’m trying to make you feel something about a character that I don’t think I could pull off as effectively in a different way. Remember how my goal is always to move a reader’s mental furniture around without them knowing I have? Sometimes swearing will make you feel a certain way about a character faster than any other method.

And sometimes it is just more hilarious.

Occasionally a reader will tell me that I don’t need to use swearing. They will follow this up with this well-worn phrase “you have a good enough vocabulary that you don’t need to use THOSE words.” Yes, I do. I do indeed. Since I don’t need to use them, that means I’m choosing to use them. If you trust me to be using non-swear words in a skillful way, please assume that I’m wielding my fucks and damns with the same contemplation.

As should all of you other writers out there. They’re just words. Handle them with care.

laurendestefano:

In case you’ve been under a rock this past week, here’s a rundown of something that has people on twitter buzzing:

On Friday, YA author Kathleen Hale published an article via The Guardian, entitled Am I Being Catfished (spoiler alert: no). Here is the article via a channel that won’t provide hits…

HOLY HELL! The debacle that is Kathleen Hale just keeps getting worse!!

Title: Rain Reign
Author: Ann M. Martin
Genre: Children’s Fiction
Publisher: Macmillan Children’s Publishing Group
Publication Date: October 7, 2014
Format: egalley via Netgalley 

Synopsis               

My rating: 5 of 5 stars 

My review: 

Thank you Macmillan Children’s Publishing Group via Netgalley for providing me with an early copy of this book! 

Rain Reign is a touching, beautifully written story about Rose, a young girl whose anchors in life are prime numbers, homonyms, and her dog, Rain. 

When a terrible storm sweeps through Rose’s town, Rain goes missing and many things start to fall apart for the lovable Rose. Her father, who is rarely around anyway, has little patience for her idiosyncrasies and frequently does and says things that will irritate and infuriate readers (at least they did me), and at school she’s often removed from class to stand in the hall to get herself together (as the teachers state it). She does, however, have a strong bond with her uncle and readers will fall in love with the way he accepts and encourages his niece – he is the perfect balance to Rose’s father’s personality. 

Though Rose struggles socially, she is very concerned with learning to use socially acceptable ways of interacting with others and finding friends. Her attempts are heartwarming and refreshing. This story, told from Rose’s point of view, gives readers a clear view of life inside the mind and life of someone with high-functioning Asperger’s. I love stories told from varying POVs like this and Martin did well. It is clear she’s done research and isn’t just through stereotypical details onto the page. Readers will feel connected to Rose; they will understand her struggles, her fears, and her joy! 

The story takes a sad turn (well, more than one really; although, one so-called sad moment actually made me happy in a bittersweet way) and following Rose through the ordeal and how she not only accepts it, but flourishes in her attempts to resolve the situation, will leave readers smiling. Seriously, I don’t think any reader can complete this book without feeling a giant swell in their heart. 

Martin has given readers a quick, easy, uplifting, and fabulous read that is perfect for children and adults alike. Pick this one up and while you’re at it, grab an extra copy for one of the kiddos in your life! 

I was provided with an ARC of this book by the publisher in exchange for an honest review. All thoughts and opinions are my own. I am not compensated for any of my reviews.

elizabethbaddeley:

Did you hear? THE ROYALS ARE IN THE WORLD SERIES!!! I put together this little homage in order to contain my excitement! 

So cool! Love our boys in blue and this is one awesome piece of celebration!

I just want to say that when I read "Coraline," I was a little girl who was afraid of everything. Not only did that book satisfy my strange need to read things that scared me, but it taught me to be brave. In a society in which girls are socialized to be scared and to be passive, this lesson of bravery was especially important for my nine-year-old self. So thank you for creating a young precocious female protagonist who was brave, even when she found herself living in a very, very scary world.
readrunramble readrunramble Said:

neil-gaiman:

… which is really all I ever wanted that book to do.

I’m glad it helped.

My daughter loves Coraline.

I still remember when my son’s 5th grade class (he’s now 16) was going to read the book and one of the over zealous moms tried t “recruit” me to her cause of getting the book booted. Yeah, not sure if she realized who she was trying to recruit, but let’s just say, she was less than pleased after we spoke :-P

accio-percabeth:

what a fucking sassafras

Rick Riordan is a crack up!

(via thebookhangover)

epicreads:

Give someone a scary book for Halloween!

(via enathebookworm)

bookaddict24-7:

October 17th
Horrorstor by Grady Hendrix
Age Group: Adult
Genres: Horror, Paranormal, Mystery
Creep-Factor: 7/10 (A haunting, an overnight mystery in a creepy store? Why not? If it isn’t creepy, then at least it’ll be an entertaining and fun read!)
“Something strange is happening at the Orsk furniture superstore in Cleveland, Ohio. Every morning, employees arrive to find broken Kjerring bookshelves, shattered Glans water goblets, and smashed Liripip wardrobes. Sales are down, security cameras reveal nothing, and store managers are panicking.
 To unravel the mystery, three employees volunteer to work a nine-hour, dusk-till-dawn shift. In the dead of the night, they’ll patrol the empty showroom floor, investigate strange sights and sounds, and encounter horrors that defy the imagination.”
Check it out on Goodreads here.
Happy reading!

This sounds like a nice, creepy read for October! Intriguing for sure!

bookaddict24-7:

October 17th

Horrorstor by Grady Hendrix

Age Group: Adult

Genres: Horror, Paranormal, Mystery

Creep-Factor: 7/10 (A haunting, an overnight mystery in a creepy store? Why not? If it isn’t creepy, then at least it’ll be an entertaining and fun read!)

Something strange is happening at the Orsk furniture superstore in Cleveland, Ohio. Every morning, employees arrive to find broken Kjerring bookshelves, shattered Glans water goblets, and smashed Liripip wardrobes. Sales are down, security cameras reveal nothing, and store managers are panicking.

 
To unravel the mystery, three employees volunteer to work a nine-hour, dusk-till-dawn shift. In the dead of the night, they’ll patrol the empty showroom floor, investigate strange sights and sounds, and encounter horrors that defy the imagination.”

Check it out on Goodreads here.

Happy reading!

This sounds like a nice, creepy read for October! Intriguing for sure!

Hmmm…maybe I should become Read, Volleyball, Ramble??? I’ve been playing more Vball than I have been running lately! Sweaty, post-game photo that I lovingly torture my hubs with by tagging him with it on FB :)

Title: A Sudden Light
Author: Garth Stein
Genre: Literature/Fiction
Publisher: Simon & Schuster
Publication Date: September 30, 2014
Format: egalley via Netgalley 

Synopsis                          

My rating: 4 of 5 stars 

My review:

Thank you Simon & Schuster via Netgalley for providing me with an early copy of this book!

If there is anything to say about Garth Stein, it is this: he has a knack for writing unique and purely lovable narrators who bring a story into a whole new light for readers! 

In A Sudden Light the narrator is a 14-year-old boy, Trevor, who just wants his parents not to get a divorce. Upon his parents’ separation, his father, Jones, takes him to The North Estate – Jones’s childhood home. It is there where Trevor digs into his legacy and the history of his ancestors. Where he learns the events that formed the man his father has become. Where he becomes intimately familiar with relatives of whom he’s never even heard. 

Stein’s prose is as mesmerizing as his narrator is endearing. His words transform the world around the reader into the logging legacy that is The North Estate. Readers will have no problem feeling a part of this story. Through Trevor readers will learn the controversial and haunting past that has crippled the Riddells for some time. The history that caused their downfall. 

Something else I’ve noticed in Stein’s characters is the fact that he can also write the characters reader love to hate. Sister Serena is one of those. She’ll keep readers wondering what exactly she’s up to the whole time, but one thing is clear – she is up to no good! 

A little bit coming of age, a little bit ghost story, and a little bit crazy family legacy, all seen through the eyes of a young man who is confused, scared, and  hurting, but is determined to find answers and hopefully bring his family back together. 

I was provided with an ARC of this book by the publisher in exchange for an honest review. All thoughts and opinions are my own. I am not compensated for any of my reviews.